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As CECC for Zika Virus confirms 13th imported Zika case, travelers returning from Zika-affected areas advised to take precautions against mosquito bites, follow “1+6 Principle” and seek immediate medical attention when symptoms develop ( 2016-10-17 )



On October 17, 2016, the Central Epidemic Command Center for Zika Virus (CECC for Zika Virus) announced the 13th imported Zika case identified in Taiwan. The case is an over 20 Thai male who visited Taiwan for work with the previously announced 12th imported Zika case. The two of them are family members. Although the case has not developed any symptoms, the local health authority still collected specimen from the case for laboratory testing according to the Zika virus prevention and control guidance and the result came back positive. Since his arrival in Taiwan, he has stayed at his workplace in Changhua County. The case has been provided with relevant health education, including the “1+6 Principle”, and asked to prevent mosquito bites and isolate himself till October 20. As of now, none of his colleagues that he came into contact with have developed suspected symptoms. The local health authority will continue to reinforce the implementation of relevant prevention measures.

Thus far this year, a total of 13 imported Zika cases have been identified in Taiwan and they respectively became infected in Thailand (4), Vietnam (2), Malaysia (2), Indonesia (1), Singapore (1), St. Lucia (1), St. Vincent and the Grenadines (1), and Florida, the U.S. (1). As of October 3, 2016, Thailand has reported a cumulative total of 392 Zika cases, including 39 pregnant women, in 16 provinces in the country. In addition, the first two cases of microcephaly have been reported in Southeast Asia.

Current scientific evidence has proved that Zika virus infection is usually mild in adults and suggested the occurrence of congenital microcephaly and even deaths in babies of mothers who were infected with Zika virus while pregnant. Therefore, pregnant women and women planning pregnancy are advised to postpone all unnecessary travels to Zika-affected areas. Travelers visiting Zika-affected areas are urged to take precautions against mosquito bites such as wearing light-colored clothing, long sleeves and long pants, applying officially approved mosquito repellent to exposed parts of the body, staying at accommodations installed with window screens, screen doors or air conditioners. CECC for Zika Virus urges travelers leaving Zika-affected areas to follow the “1+6 Principle” to prevent Zika transmission. The “1+6 Principle” specifies that people who have recently traveled to Zika-affected areas should monitor their own health and take precautions against mosquito bites for at least 3 weeks, postpone blood donation for at least 1 month, and regardless whether they develop suspected Zika symptoms, they should practice safe sex for at least 6 months to prevent Zika transmission. In addition, female travelers should postpone pregnancy for at least 6 months.

Since 2015, at least 67 countries, areas and/or territories worldwide. Overall, the Zika outbreaks in Latin America and the Caribbean region have started to slow. Taiwan CDC has issued a travel notice of Level 2: Alert for Zika virus for 63 countries and territories with ongoing outbreaks or possible local transmission of Zika virus, including 7 countries in Asia: Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Singapore, and Maldives, and 4 counties in Florida: Broward, Miami-Dade, Pinellas and Palm Beach counties. Moreover, about 4 countries, including Laos, have previously reported Zika outbreaks. Nonetheless, thus far in 2016, no Zika cases have been reported in those 4 countries. Hence, Taiwan CDC has issued a travel notice of Level 1: Watch for Zika virus for those countries.

CECC for Zika Virus once again urges travelers visiting Zika-affected areas to take precautions against mosquito bites such as wearing light-colored clothing, long sleeves and long pants, applying officially approved mosquito repellent to exposed parts of the body, staying at accommodations installed with window screens, screen doors or air conditioners. Travelers returning to Taiwan from affected areas are advised to proactively contact the quarantine officer at the fever screening station at the airport when suspected symptoms develop and follow the “1+6 Principle” to prevent Zika transmission. If symptoms develop within two weeks of their return, please seek immediate medical attention and inform the physician of their travel history. At the same time, physicians are urged to heighten vigilance for suspected cases, inquire patients of their travel history when necessary and report suspected cases to the competent health authority as soon as possible in order to lower the risk of local transmission. For more information, please visit the Taiwan CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov.tw or call the toll-free Communicable Disease Reporting and Consultation Hotline, 1922 (or 0800-001922).



  • Last modified at 2016-10-17
  • Data from Division of Planning and Coordination